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  • Julie Eickhoff

Finding his Purpose: A Student Success Story


In today's blog post, we have the pleasure of introducing you to Albert Adams, a voice artist who embarked on a remarkable journey from a background in restaurant management and forklift driving to discovering his true passion in the world of voiceovers. Albert's story is a testament to the power of pursuing one's dreams and the incredible transformation that can occur when you take the leap. Let's dive into his experience with the "Work from Home doing Voice Overs" course and learn more about his journey.


**Q: What was your background (education/career) prior to enrolling in the Work from Home doing Voice Overs course?**


A: I had a high school diploma and had taken a few college courses. Prior to enrolling in the course, I had worked as a restaurant manager, multi-unit restaurant manager, and even as a franchise consultant. However, I had also spent 15 years driving a forklift in factories and warehouses. At the time of starting the course, I was training for a work-from-home job that I quickly realized I disliked. I discussed this with my sons, and we collectively decided that I should pursue voiceover full-time. It was not an easy decision, but just a week after quitting my previous job, I secured my first audiobook project. Since then, I've produced seven audiobooks.


**Q: What motivated you to enroll in the Work from Home doing Voice Overs course?**


A: The idea of pursuing voiceovers came to me when a coworker and I did some role-playing during training. Until then, I had never considered it. I had no idea where to begin, so I turned to Google, like we all do nowadays, to research how to become a voiceover talent. While I was investigating, I received an email advertisement for this course. I usually ignore such emails, but this time, I decided to check it out, and that's how I got started on this path.


**Q: Could you share your initial expectations about the course? Did it meet or exceed those expectations?**


A: This course definitely exceeded my expectations. My initial expectations were simply to learn how to get started in the voiceover industry without breaking the bank. There were other courses that charged a significant amount of money, but I needed to move quickly while keeping the lights on. This course exceeded my expectations. I not only learned how to properly master my audio files but also significantly improved my script reads. I hadn't even completed half of the course when I started producing my first audiobook. I am very grateful for this course and what it has done for me to get my voice over business off the ground.



**Q: How long ago did you complete the course?**


A: I completed the course less than a year ago.


**Q: How much time do you spend working as a voice artist? (part-time, side gig, full-time?)**


A: Voiceover is now a full-time endeavor for me. I get to do something I love, and it's not work; it has become an obsession to grow and be successful.


**Q: What types of voice over work have you completed so far? Audiobooks, commercials, podcasts, etc.?**


A: So far, I have produced seven audiobooks. I also had one callback for a small, unpaid role in a short student film, even though I didn't secure the role. It was an exciting learning experience.


**Q: What’s your favorite type of voice over work?**


A: I love looking for opportunities to do character voices.


**Q: What’s a typical workday like for you when you are doing voice over work?**


A: My typical workday involves:

1. Checking emails.

2. Checking ACX for new books to produce.

3. Looking for video production companies to contact.

4. Sending a minimum of 15-20 emails.

5. If there are no projects, I listen to demos and search for scripts to record for future marketing purposes throughout the year.

6. Continuing to work on my marketing and business plan.


It's not uncommon for me to spend hours with my laptop, losing track of time, and still finding time to step into my booth and record.


**Q: What do you love most about being a voice artist?**


A: I've always been a big kid, using silly voices to entertain coworkers and my sons. Now, I've found a way to do something I've always loved and get paid for it. The more I pursue this, the more I realize that this is what I should be doing.


**Q: What advice would you offer to others who are considering becoming a voice artist?**


A: Like anything in life, this takes practice, and there will be steps forward and steps back. No matter what happens, HAVE FUN! It's okay to be a kid again, to play pretend like you used to do when you didn't care what anyone thought of you. Be that kid again.


**Q: Please describe your recording space. Where do you record? How did you treat the space?**


A: My recording space is in a closet where most outside noise enters. I've placed a four-inch foam mattress topper on its side along one wall. Two twin-sized foam mattress toppers surround my microphone, and two old, thick comforter blankets are positioned overhead and behind me. On the final side of my booth, there is another comforter blanket and a moving blanket. My microphone is attached to a small side table. Everything was purchased from Goodwill, except for the thick mattress topper, which had to be sacrificed for the greater good. In total, the cost was less than $100.


**Q: Is there anything you'd like to add?**


A: Many of us go through life feeling like we were meant to do something else or trying to find our purpose. I was meant to do this! I'm still learning, and I have no idea where this is going to take me, but I know it's who I am!


If you'd like to explore Albert's work and learn more about his journey, visit his website: www.albert-adamsvoice.com


You can also find his audiobooks on Audible HERE





Albert Adams' journey from forklift driver to successful voice artist is a testament to the power of pursuing one's passion. If you're considering a career in voiceovers, remember Albert's advice: practice, have fun, and let your inner child play. Who knows where your journey might lead you?

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